Whether as a decorative bank planting around garden ponds or elegant indoor grasses – the sedge, which is one of the perennials, enjoys numerous uses both in domestic green spaces and in the house. The grasses, which are available in different types, come in a variety of color variations; In addition to classic green-leaved plants, grasses with green-white, green-yellow or green-white-brown leaf colors are available. Easy to care for and robust, even beginners get along well with the decorative plant.

Segge – Arten

Sedges are available in different designs; Depending on the species, the sedge prefer different locations. The morning star sedge is one of the best-known types of sedge, originally native to South America, with very conspicuous, star-shaped fruit stands that take on a slightly spherical shape. The plant, which presents lush green broad overhanging leaves, reaches a total height of 60cm during flowering. The fox-red sedge also grows up to 60cm high, but has curled or curled leaves of a rusty red color, while the inflorescences appear rather inconspicuous and are light brown in color. Last but not least, the Japanese sedge is often cultivated in domestic gardens. The grass with its evergreen shapely clumps and edged, bent leaves,

Types of Japanese sedge

The Japanese sedge can be divided into numerous, very decorative subspecies.

The white Japanese sedge “Variegata”, which forms a wide eyrie and overhangs like a scab, is very popular with hobby gardeners. In May the plant forms yellowish ears that only peek out slightly from the foliage; the edges of the narrow, dark green stalks are creamy-white in color, creating a decorative contrast to rhododendrons. The “Silver Scepter” variety also has overhanging leaves that appear variegated in white. Among the Japanese sedge, this variety is one of the lowest plants overall, only reaching a total height of about 20 cm. For this reason, the grass is particularly popular as a ground cover. With the “Everest” Japanese sedge, hobby gardeners receive a decorative green and white striped grass, which is particularly suitable for rock gardens and offers a nice contrast to the “Evergold” variety; This is a particularly elegant looking grass from the great variety of the Japanese sedge, which presents dark green lined leaves with a wide, creamy yellow central stripe. This variety also fits perfectly in near-natural rock gardens and reaches a height of up to 30cm. The Japanese sedge “Mosten”, on the other hand, is a particularly tall plant that grows upright and overhangs and develops yellow-brown flowers between March and May. This robust variety is preferably cultivated in partially shaded areas, for example on the edge of the wood. creamy yellow median. This variety also fits perfectly in near-natural rock gardens and reaches a height of up to 30cm. The Japanese sedge “Mosten”, on the other hand, is a particularly tall plant that grows upright and overhangs and develops yellow-brown flowers between March and May. This robust variety is preferably cultivated in partially shaded areas, for example on the edge of the wood. creamy yellow median. This variety also fits perfectly in near-natural rock gardens and reaches a height of up to 30cm. The Japanese sedge “Mosten”, on the other hand, is a particularly tall plant that grows upright and overhangs and develops yellow-brown flowers between March and May. This robust variety is preferably cultivated in partially shaded areas, for example on the edge of the wood.

Different locations and substrate conditions

Depending on the species, different locations are possible for the sedge. The morning star sedge is best cultivated in a shady to partially shaded area in the garden, for example on the bank of water or within swamp beds. If there is plenty of soil moisture, such species can also be planted in perennial beds. The morning star is particularly effective in small groups. A soil that has the following properties can be used as a substrate:

  • fresh to moist consistency
  • rich in nutrients
  • fumes

The palm frond sedge, which reaches a size of almost one meter during the flowering period and presents delicate pal frond-like leaves, also prefers such locations and soil conditions. Both the stiff sedge and the false cypergrass harrow can even be placed in shallow water, whereby depths of up to 20 cm are tolerated.

In rock gardens, on beds and borders as well as steppe or heather beds, however, the fox-red sedge comes into its own. This species prefers sunny open spaces and a humus rich, nutrient-rich and above all well-drained soil. Also for rock gardens and in a sunny location are the cushion-shaped upholstery sedge and the mountain sedge; both variants also prefer a calcareous soil.

If, on the other hand, the sedge is to be used primarily for the edge of the wood and under wood, the range of sedges is particularly large. The Japanese sedge is one of the most popular sedge that are cultivated on the edge of the wood. The grass can also be used in beds and borders and combined with hostas, ferns and rhododendrons. As a classic location, this species prefers a preferably partially shaded and protected area in the garden, which offers fresh to moderately moist humus and loamy soil.
If the sedge is kept indoors, a warm room has proven to be a suitable location, which ideally should have a slightly higher level of humidity. It has proven useful to place the plants in water-filled coasters on a layer of pebbles and to spray the stalks regularly with lime-free water.

Watering, fertilizing, overwintering – optimal care

While species such as the red sedge or the morning star sedge are quite frugal in terms of irrigation, the Japanese sedge in particular should be additionally watered in summer, especially if the drought persists. However, with the other species, too, it is important to ensure that the soil never dries out completely. If the grass is kept indoors, watering should be regular, but not too vigorous. Just enough liquid is added so that the ball of the pot is always slightly damp. The top layer of soil then has to dry out between waterings before the plant is watered again. Both the outdoor plant and the indoor plant are sensitive to waterlogged substrate, waterlogging or complete dryness.
Sedges have an overall low nutritional requirement. It is generally recommended to provide the plants with a liquid fertilizer twice a year; in addition or – depending on the soil – alternatively, it has proven useful to spread some compost in early spring. Near-natural gardens usually offer sufficient nutrients in the soil so that sedges do not have to be fertilized there. Over-fertilization, on the other hand, must be avoided at all costs; If the sedge receives too many nutrients, the growth of the plant is accelerated to such an extent that the plant as a whole becomes more susceptible to diseases and pests.

Wintering is uncomplicated for most types of sedges. The following aspects must be taken into account:

  • Cover Japanese sedge with leaves and brushwood in winter
  • Indoor plants should overwinter in rooms with a temperature of 16 ° C
  • There is no fertilization during the winter

Cut sedges in a targeted manner

The most important maintenance measures for the sedges include thinning out the plant as well as a targeted pruning once a year. This measure is particularly necessary if the individual clumps are too large or the grass is disheveled as a whole. Spring is particularly suitable for pruning; hobby gardeners can also enjoy the decorative stalks in winter, which – covered with powder snow – represent a very special focal point. In addition, cutting in spring also provides excellent additional winter protection. As part of the cutting measures, first dead stalks are removed and dried out or frost-damaged parts of the plant are separated. This is followed by a targeted pruning, which should be done close to the ground. It has been proven Gather the grass in smaller bundles before cutting to make it easier to cut. At the same time, this also makes disposal easier. It is cut either with a knife that is as sharp as possible or with hedge trimmers or the brush cutter. Experienced gardeners can also use rotating pruners for this; Beginners, however, should refrain from using such cutting tools, as there is a slight risk that plant debris or stones will be thrown away. Telescopic scissors, on the other hand, are equally suitable for beginners and advanced users. Experienced gardeners can also use rotating pruners for this; Beginners, however, should refrain from using such cutting tools, as there is a slight risk that plant debris or stones will be thrown away. Telescopic scissors, on the other hand, are equally suitable for beginners and advanced users. Experienced gardeners can also use rotating pruners for this; Beginners, however, should refrain from using such cutting tools, as there is a slight risk that plant debris or stones will be thrown away. Telescopic scissors, on the other hand, are equally suitable for beginners and advanced users.
Note: It is essential to wear gloves when cutting, as the stalks have very sharp edges that can quickly lead to injuries.

Planting and Propagating

The sedge is propagated by dividing the rootstock. In a first step, the root ball around the plant is cut off and then the defined area is lifted out of the earth with a digging fork. Care should be taken that the fine root runners are not damaged. The dug out bale is then divided into two to three pieces, each of which should be about the size of a fist. More than three pieces should never be made from the root ball, as the individual pieces would be too small to grow on optimally; The susceptibility to diseases and pests is then also increased. The sections are preferably selected from a more recent growth area of ​​the root. Each section should have at least one shoot bud and enough roots. Often a knife has to be used for the division; Unclean separation points then have to be cut again and torn parts of the root removed so that there is no target for diseases. The individual specimens are then placed in the prepared soil in a timely manner. Finally, the substrate is carefully watered so that the plant can grow well.

Both adult plants and seeds of the sedge are preferably grown in spring. In the house, sedges are first grown in flower pots; Standard standard ground can be used for this. As soon as the leaves completely cover the surface of the earth, the young plants can be moved to larger pots or outdoors in the coming spring. Freshly set plants are adequately watered in the field.

Pests

Overall, sedges are quite resistant to diseases and pests. However, excessive fertilization can increase susceptibility to pests; this usually shows an aphid infestation, which manifests itself in a characteristic damage pattern:

  • Infestation mainly on stems, densely packed, sedentary colonies of aphids
  • sticky parts of the plant that are often covered with black fungus
  • Taking care of the plant

As a tried and tested first measure, the targeted hosing down of the grass with a powerful jet of water has proven itself. If the sedge is already heavily infested, the use of insecticides may also be indicated; As a sustainable alternative, spraying with soap solutions or tansy tea have proven to be useful. If the sedge is in the garden, beneficial insects such as ladybirds can also help.

Conclusion
Sedges are among the most decorative grasses in the home garden, which can be used variably in numerous areas of the green area. This variety of uses is also evident from the different types that are available in stores. As robust plants that require little maintenance, the grasses beautify pond areas as well as woody plants or sandy open spaces and always set new accents.

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